Lead Out of Your Team’s Strengths

Each person on your team has strengths and weaknesses in musicianship and in worship leadership. Both vocalists and instrumentalists many times do not want to admit or discuss their own weaknesses. Instead, they quickly say they can handle the situation or musical challenge. Therefore, if you are the leader, you MUST be able to see where each of your team struggles, even when they won’t tell you. At the same time, look for their strength not only individually, but look for how their strength gives strength to the entire vocal / instrumental team.

As you select others to lead worship with you, consider…

vocal strength
vocal range
ability to harmonize
ability to blend
ability to lead out on a solo or teaching a song to the congregation
ability to play piano and sing at the same time
ability to play guitar and sing at the same time
ability to lead worship while playing lead guitar
ability to speak while playing the guitar
ability to get along with the team
ability to plan worship
servant heart
ability to memorize
helps bring unity to the team
ability to transpose

As you plan worship, consider…
1) your leadership style (your strengths when you lead);
2) your team’s strengths when they sing, play and lead;
3) your church’s worship style.

Apply this filter each time you select songs and every time you plan the order of service. Use YOUR gifts of leadership and music to truly LEAD your team to be stronger each week than the week before.

 

 

 

burnout or balance

Wikipedia says: “Burnout is a psychological term for the experience of long-term exhaustion and diminished interest.”

Those in the ministry, including worship pastors, are not exempt from burning out?

We try to be everything to everyone.
We are pulled in all directions.
We plan.
We organize.
We counsel.
We rehearse.
We learn new music.
We practice our skill.
We prepare to lead every week.
We prepare a team to lead each week.

The list goes on and on.

When you feel that life is getting out of balance, stop and evaluate. Tell trusted friends. Let them help you see how to find balance in your busy world.

Balance in life (at home with family and at your work place) will allow you to minister to others over the long haul.

Be aware of burn out, then do everything you can do to avoid it.

 

 

Find What Works for You When Teaching a New Song

Teaching new songs to your congregation is one of the unwritten job descriptions for every worship leader.

Try pointing your congregation to a source for them to listen to the song before you ever present it. You could simply post a blog or send an email with the songs that you plan to lead in upcoming weeks. Include links to iTunes or Spotify, etc. Encourage your congregation to listen to the songs several times before they attend worship. Help them to understand that corporate singing is stronger when everyone is singing and knows the song.

You may try singing a verse and chorus one week, then include the entire song on the second and third week. Experiment until you find what works best for you and your congregation.

The songs you teach may become a part of your worship repertoire for years to come.

 

 

Average, Good, Excellent

Take a few minutes and determine if your worship band is average, good or excellent.

Now, write down the WHY.
Why AVERAGE? or Why GOOD? or Why EXCELLENT?

What would be their evaluation of you as their leader: average, good or excellent?
Be honest with yourself about how they would answer.

If your team’s level of musicianship, leadership, discipleship, etc is equal to you, you may not be able to help them grow stronger in these areas. If your team is below your level, with patience, you can bring them to a higher level. If you team is ahead of you in musicianship and leadership, they will be frustrated with as a musician or as a leader or both.

Take a look at yourself. Know your strengths and weaknesses. Work weekly to strengthen yourself in order to be a better leader, a better musician, and a more disciplined follower of Christ. Those you lead will appreciate your example.

 

Get Check – Go Home

If your church is able to pay musicians, it is important to find individuals who are not serving just because they are paid. Some musicians (both vocalists and instrumentalists) can become more interested in getting paid than in playing or singing. Your event becomes just another gig.

So, if you are the leader responsible for hiring musicians, be sure to check their heart, check their references, and check their attitude before committing to hire them.

ASK YOURSELF THESE QUESTIONS…
Is this person I am considering hiring a team player?
Is this individual already volunteering in other ministry areas?

Strengthen your team by helping them understand the reward of serving others in ministry, whether they get paid or not.

SERVE THE LORD WITH GLADNESS….  Psalm 100:2

 

 

 

Background Check?

In “church work” we expect everything to be true on an application or in the information that is told to us in an interview. However, there are individuals with criminal activity on their personal record who interview for ministry positions. If you, the interviewer, do not ask the right questions, or if the interviewee lies with his/her answers, you may not find important information that will help you make the right decision about employing the applicant with your organization.

The money and time spent on helping you make wise decisions in your interview process will pay off with quality employees who bring value to your organization.

 

Two Work Segments Per Day

A friend recently shared with me that his pastor requires all full time staff to break the work day into three segments: 1) morning; 2) afternoon; 3) evening. Each full time staff person can only work two segments in one day. The other segment must be given to family and/or personal time.

So often, leaders work long morning hours, long afternoon hours, then much of the evening. They will eventually burn out if there is not time to rest and recharge.

If you are responsible for full time staff members, give them the freedom to only work two segments per day. Also, for those who are workaholics, hold them accountable to take time off.

Matthew 11:28 says, “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.”

Read Matthew 11:28-30.
Rest in Jesus.
Rest.

He is Able to Humble

Daniel 4 describes King Nebuchadnezzar’s pride. Take a few minutes and read Daniel 4.

It is easy for pride to swell in the hearts of worship leaders while singing and leading songs that speak of a humble heart.

Verse 37 says, “… those who walk in pride he is able to humble.”

Spend time alone with God this week. Read Daniel 4. Ask God to show you the areas in your life that are full of pride. Humility is not easy, but as worship leaders, we need to learn to walk with a humble heart. If you are willing, pray that God will make you humble, ALL for His glory and honor. Then, in times of brokenness, thank him for answering your prayer.

A HEART AFTER GOD
“Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.” Ps 51:10 ESV
“He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness and to walk humbly with your God?” Micah 6:8

 

Consistent Blocks of Time

The only way to effectively create and plan worship is to have time away from EVERYONE and EVERYTHING.

Find blocks of time each week to get away.

Spend time…
- praying
- reading scripture
- listening to new songs
- planning the order of worship
- learning the lyrics to the songs you will lead
- understanding the text
- preparing for rehearsal

Later in the week, spend time focused on every note, every transition, every word, every song, etc. Review every part of the service ALONE (before you do a final sound check and rehearsal).

You will grow stronger in your leadership if you grow stronger in your preparation. Start this week!

 

 

Build One Relationship at a Time

Worship Leader:

When you arrive at a new church, you experience relationship overload. So many new faces, new names, and new ideas…. all coming to you at once. It is impossible to really get to know everyone at the same time.

Find two or three individuals who seem to have the same values as you do. Begin to find ways they can help you move toward your vision and goals. Invest in them and allow them to invest in your ministry.

Take your time and God will be honored.

 

 

 

Page 3 of 11«12345»10...Last »